TRANSFORM YOUR CAMPING TRIP INTO A ROMANTIC GETAWAY

Romantic Camping Tents

Romantic Camping Tent

Tents protect you from weather and bugs. They are a comfortable place to tell stories or watch the sky. When Romantic Camping your tent space is home base for Romantic activity. Always invest in a high quality tent. This investment will greatly improve the quality of your camping experience!

So which tent is right for you? Your choices boil down to finding a balance of weight versus comfort and convenience. Know your style of camping or backpacking. This will help you determine which type of tent will work best.

Tent Types

Summer Tents: These camping tents are ideal for hot climates. They include a generous amount of mesh in the tent body to maximize ventilation. The rain fly is designed to stop several inches above the ground to also allow good ventilation.

Three-Season Tents: These are popular backpacking tents. They usually have enough interior space for waiting out the brief storms of spring, summer, and fall. Most can handle gusty winds and rain, but not heavy snow loads.

Four-season Tents: These are weatherproof tents designed for mountaineering and winter camping. Rounded edges and one or two additional poles help withstand heavy snow and high winds. Rounded dome designs eliminate flat roof spaces where snow can collect.

All Season (Convertible) Tents: These are 4-season models which can be converted into 3-season tents. This is usually accomplished by removing pole sections and/or zipping off a roof panel. These tents can be a good choice for year-round adventurers who want only one tent.

Basic Tent Components

  • Fabric: Material is made of lightweight and durable nylon or polyester.

ROMANTIC IDEA: Select a tent with a warm colored fabric like red, yellow or orange. When the sunlight is filtered through your tent it will then create a warm Romantic ambiance.
  • Floor: The flooring should be made from a single-piece of waterproof material.
  • Footprint: This is a waterproof layer between the tent floor and the ground. This layer can protect your tent from any rocks or sticks that might tear the fabric. The footprint is also commonly called a ground cloth or tarp.
  • Poles: Collapsible lightweight tent poles are made of aluminum, fiberglass or carbon fiber.
  • Rain Fly: Attachable waterproof layer that clips to the tent frame. The rain fly requires additional stakes (fewer the better). The rain fly also protects you from the wind. The lower the rain fly is to the ground the better the protection.
  • Stakes: Lightweight metal or plastic stakes are necessary to keep the tent from blowing away like a kite. Stakes often bend and need to be replaced.
  • Storage Features: Gear loops, lofts and pockets inside the tent are designed for hanging lights and storing your stuff. The more storage features the better!
  • Vestibules: Floorless covered section located outside the tent entrance. This valuable space can be used for the dry storage of camping gear like boots, packs and other small equipment.
  • Windows (and Doors): Mesh windows and doors minimize condensation and allow fresh air to circulate. Ceiling windows are ideal for summer nights!

Tent Size

Manufacturers determine size by the number of people the tent can sleep. Realize that these specifications do NOT always align with reality. It’s quite common for a “Two Person” tent to barely fit one adult. You don’t want a tent that is too small. Know your space preferences! This will help you find the right tent size.

Tent Set-Up

Beware of Fire: Not too close to the fire! Campfires will spit out tiny sparks that can drift in the air. If sparks land on your tent they will turn it into swiss cheese. I’ve learned this the hard way. Make sure your tent is at least twenty feet from your fire.

Find the Flat: Looks can be deceiving. Try lying down in the tent or on the footprint before staking your tent down. I also recommend setting up your tent in spaces that are clearly used on a regular basis. Doing so reduces the impact on the environment.

Near Water: Camping by water is Romantic. If you are filtering or boiling your drinking water you don’t want to carry it very far. Water has a soothing (and Romantic) ambient sound and look. The ambient sound from a creek or river can also mask primal groans.

Tent Sex Kit

The Tent Sex Kit items are a MUST HAVE on your camping checklist! Pack this gear where it can be easily accessible from inside your tent.

  • Condoms: There are advantages to condoms while camping. Of course, they help prevent disease and pregnancy. They also contain the mess! When using condoms it’s easier to dispose of the sex smells that might attract animals in the night. They also help avoid the wet-spot in the sleeping bag.
  • Lubricants: This is not always needed. However, it can be good to have sometimes. There are many brands out-there. Finding your favorite is part of the fun! Bring a small plastic bottle and store the lubricant in a zip-loc bag! You don’t want it to explode and make a sticky mess.
  • Wet Wipes: Often called moist towelettes or baby wipes, these are essential for Romantic Camping. They have many uses. For example, make yourself fresh (and lovable) in moments. Get rid of the sweat, sunscreen and bug spray! They also work great for cleaning-up after sex.
  • Towel: Keeping a small hand-towel handy is recommended. It can be useful for after sex clean-up. A towel is sometimes needed for other liquid spills that might occur in your tent. Towels can be easily washed and dried. They are also smaller than a box of tissues.
  • Zip Lock: Sealable plastic bags are great for camping. They can be used for containing wet, messy or smelly items (I think you know what I mean). Bring a few extra zip-loc bags! Chances are they will be helpful for keeping your tent clean and odor free.

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